The Just A Minute Cookbook (1952)

The Just A Minute Cookbook (1952)

Title: “The Just A Minute Cookbook”
Author: ALICE WILSON RICHARDSON
Publisher: PRENTICE-HALL, INC. New York
Year of Publication: 1952
Pages: ~159
LOC Catalog Entry: http://lccn.loc.gov/52009350
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

INTRODUCTION:

“If you work, if you have week-end guests, or if you simply don’t want to spend your life in the kitchen, this book is your dish.

Kitchens can and should be attractive, convenient and comfortable, but if you are the type who likes to spend hours on end in them, this book is not for you.

It’s not for drudges, putterers or anti-social people. It’s for people who like to serve food with a flair and like to sip a cocktail and be gay with their guests meanwhile.

You don’t have to be an expert cook to follow these recipes. For, even though the prescribed use of wines and herbs in most of the main dishes will make your guests think you are a culinary genius, there is not one instruction which will be over an amateur’s head.

This book is not supposed to be a begin-all and end-all in cookery. Every good kitchen should have a basic cook book which can be referred to when you want to bake a cake, can tomatoes or preserve strawberries. Just a Minute will not do that for you. But it will tell you what you can have for supper when you get home from the office and your husband, beau or guests are arriving within the hour. The menus are short because the theory of the book is that few dishes and ample portions are easier to prepare and more satisfying to the appetite.

Always remember that the number of people a dish will serve depends on what goes with it and how hungry your guests are.

Be flexible in following the recipes. The more proficient you become, the more you will be able to measure to taste in the Southern Mammy tradition. After experimenting with a dish several times, you will be able to add a soupcon of this or a dash of that so that the recipe will become your very own and not a cook book reproduction.

Quick cookery means less time in the kitchen and more time with your guests. It means, in short, a quick, easy success—which is good enough for anyone.

You’ll find what a successful hostess you can be when you say “Dinner in Just a Minute,” and mean it.”

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Read This First 1
They’ll Think You’re a Pro 3
Herb Chart 6
Wine Chart 7
Short Cuts and Tricks 8
Freeze Treatment 14
Under Pressure 16
Fast Starters 18
Cocktails 19
Canapés 24
Soups 29
Quick Entrées—Easy Menus 35
Vegetables 80
Happy Endings 91
Salads—Salad Dressings 92
Desserts 97
Right in the Living Room 101
Not Quick but Easy 119
The Very Last Minute 140
Index 147

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Eat-Well Diet Book (1956)

Eat-Well Diet Book (1956)

Title: “Eat-Well Diet Book”
Author: Charlotte Adams
Publisher: RANDOM HOUSE•NEW YORK
Year of Publication: 1956
Pages: ~130
LOC Catalog Entry: http://lccn.loc.gov/56001507
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

EXCERPT:

“Though there is still a great deal to be learned on the subject, doctors and psychologists are pretty much in agreement that people are better off if they are not overweight. Sometimes you hear people argue that there are civilizations in which being fat is positively chic. Well, we don’t live in one. You have to feel attractive if you’re going to have a happy life—and this means that your mind must be free for better uses than embarrassment or anguish over being so round that there’s no way to drape the form or suck in the paunch to deceive the rest of the critical world. Most people like their clothes to fit properly, and the battle of the bulges is apt to make this a constant problem. That, by the way, can help you keep yourself thin. Have your clothes taken in as you lose weight, then stay within these limits. Your clothes will show off a figure of which you can be progressively more proud and thus encourage you to stay that way.

Another major reason for losing weight is the sense of well-being that goes along with being slimmer. If you’ve always weighed too much, you can’t imagine what it’s like. But if you get yourself down to the weight that is right for you, you will love it. And you’ll like yourself better.

The sense of well-being is, of course, closely tied with health. You puff and blow when you move fast, or even when you talk, if you’re carrying enough extra pounds. It’s uncomfortable—and it may be an indication that a more serious disability than that is in the offing. There is still much knowledge to be gained about the relationship of overweight to disease, whether it be of the heart or some of the other organs. But medical doctors, psychologists, nutritionists and public health people agree that until we learn more we’ll do well to accept the theory that there is some correlation between overweight and disease.

So! Lose weight because you’ll look better, feel better, perhaps live longer. These are powerful reasons. They should be enough to get you over the hump of inertia or constant hunger or whatever it is that has let you get too fat. But, you’ll say, losing weight is easier said than done. Of course it is. That’s the reason for this book, which is written for men and women who want to live well and eat well all year long, and still lose weight. This includes a great many persons. I am one myself. I know that it’s no fun to weigh too much, and I also know that cooking and eating food are two of the most pleasant experiences man is privileged to have. I loathe rabbit and monkey and faddist foods, and I love sauces and seasonings and butter and crisp fat on meat.

Because I love food so much I have had to spend a good deal of time dieting. As a writer and reporter in the field of food I have also talked with authorities on food and nutrition and read as widely as I could, and in 1955 I attended the first “colloquium” on weight control ever held in the United States.

Out of these experiences I have developed a philosophy of weight control:

1. It is not necessary to give up eating everything you like to lose weight.

2. It is not only not necessary, but not good, to count calories and measure and weigh everything you eat.

3. It is absolutely necessary to change your eating habits if you’re going to lose weight and have it stay lost.”

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

part 1 ALL ABOUT DIETING
Chapter One—Why Lose Weight? page 6
Chapter Two—How Do You Know You’re Overweight? page 8
Chapter Three-How Did You Get Fat? page 10
Chapter Four-How Can You Stick With a Diet? page 12
Chapter Five—How About Dieting Aids? page 14
Chapter Six—You Have to Exercise page 16
Chapter Seven-What to Eat page 18
Chapter Eight—How to Plan It page 24

part 2 RECIPES FOR DIETERS
Chapter Nine—How to Cook It page 34
Chapter Ten—First Courses page 38
Chapter Eleven—Soups page 42
Chapter Twelve—Eggs and Cheese page 48
Chapter Thirteen—Bread page 56
Chapter Fourteen—Meats page 60
Chapter Fifteen—Poultry page 76
Chapter Sixteen—Seafood page 84
Chapter Seventeen—Vegetables page 90
Chapter Eighteen—Salads page 100
Chapter Nineteen—Desserts page 112
Chapter Twenty—Special 30-Day Diet page 122

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Husband and Wife Diet Cookbook (1955)

Husband and Wife Diet Cookbook (1955)

Title: “Husband and Wife Diet Cookbook”
Author: Dr. P.W. Punnett
Publisher: Fawcett Publications, Inc., Greenwich, Conn
Year of Publication: 1955
Pages: ~146
LOC Catalog Entry: No record found
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

INTRODUCTION:

“The writer, having been engaged in the chemical field for over 40 years, chiefly in work on food and nutrition, naturally has been exposed to all sorts of statements about food, all kinds of beliefs about what is “good for you” and what isn’t, how much you should eat and how little. A great many commonly accepted beliefs about nutrition have no basis in fact. But they seem to be so deeply rooted in many of us that they have the resistance of the hardiest weeds in our gardens. Perhaps our educational methods are inadequate, for it seems to take years and years for accurate and vital information about food to reach the vast majority of our citizens.

Nevertheless, it is the writer’s opinion that practically everyone can understand the basic facts about food and nutrition and can appreciate their importance if they are presented in simple language. Such an understanding is essential if a person is one of the millions in this country who are living under the handicap of weighing too much or too little. It is a handicap that may mean ill health and too early a death for everyone of this group.

And so I have written this book in an effort to show you how important your weight is to you and your family and to give you a sound basis-free from fads and fancies —on which you can plan a program to eliminate this drag on your health. Since most people live as members of families, I have tried to emphasize the value of cooperation and understanding on the part of both Husband and Wife. It isn’t always easy to control your weight, but you can do it—without suffering or danger-and you’ll be a better man or woman it you do.”

P.W. Punnett

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Introduction 3
You Are Gambling With Your Life 4
The Causes of Overweight 7
Fads, Fancies and Alibis 12
The Remarkable Proteins 18
The Vitamin Family 24
The Remaining Essentials 32
Few Foods Are Simple Foods 37
New Types of Foods 44
for the wife:
How Can You Tell When You Need to Diet ? 48
Before You Start 52
Help Yourself 56
Minimum Daily Requirements 60
This Is What You Do 64
husbands only:
Are YOU Overweight? 69
Begin With a Plan 72
What You MUST Have 76
This Is the Way It’s Done 79
Rx for Underweight 83
Menus and Suggestions 88
Low-Calorie Recipes 102
Calorie Table of Common Foods 128

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Famous New Orleans Drinks And How to Mix’em (1937)

Famous New Orleans Drinks And How to Mix’em (1937)

Title: “Famous New Orleans Drinks And How to Mix’em”
Author: STANLEY CLISBY ARTHUR
Publisher: HARMANSON, NEW ORLEANS
Year of Publication: 1937
Pages: ~96
LOC Catalog Entry: http://lccn.loc.gov/38001052
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

EXCERPT:

“Hail New Orleans that for more than a century has been the home of civilized drinking. From the time of its settlement by the French, through the domination of the Spanish, and occupation by the Americana after the Louisiana Purchase, the flowing bowl and the adept mixing of what went in it has constituted as high an art in this Creole city as the incomparable cooking for which it is famed.

The quality of mixed drinks as served in New Orleans has always appealed to the sophisticated taste, but the drinks and their histories are forever linked with the past of this pleasure-loving city out of which has come so much that is beautiful and gay, and so much that is worth preserving.

It was here that your pious Creole lady guilelessly brewed muscadine wine and blackberry cordial and peach brandy chocked with authority. It was here that your gentlemen of the old school, more or less pleasantly corned in season and out, made a cult of preparing a drink and a ritual of downing it. It was here that your most modern of American beverages, the cocktail, first came into being and was given its jaunty name.

With a desire to acquaint the world—or that part of the world that may be interested—with the art of mixing a drink as it is done in New Orleans, the author of this book has cajoled from old and new experts the recipes handed down through succeeding generations and presents them herein for your delec¬tation with a smile and a “Sante!”

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Aperitif 7
The Birth of the Cocktail 9
Whiskey Drinks 15
Juleps 27
Absinthe Drinks 34
Gin Drinks 42
Rum Drinks 59
Pousse Cafes 69
Brandy Drinks 72
Cafe Brulot 74
Toddies, Slings, and Flips 78
Flips 79
Slings 80
Swizzle 82
Punches 84
Wassail Bowl 88
Eggsnogs 89
White Ribbon Punch 92
The Contradiction 94
Index 95

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The Cookie Jar (1940)

The Cookie Jar (1940)

Title: “The Cookie Jar (Around The World Making Cookies)”
Author: Josephine Perry
Publisher: New York, M. Barrows & company, incorporated
Year of Publication: 1940
Pages: ~175
LOC Catalog Entry: http://lccn.loc.gov/40027497
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

INTRODUCTION:

“THE COOKIE JAR is the outgrowth of a hobby which began in my childhood and lasted through twenty years.

I loved the attic better than any room in the old house in the South where I was reared. Evidently my great-grandmother had the same fondness for it. She hoarded valuables in that attic. Her recipes, in a hand-written cook book, which I found in the attic, began my hobby for collecting formulas for small cakes. The interesting information she had written about the cakes was the in-spiration for writing this book.

The collector’s demand for nothing but the authentic grew in me as the years passed. No formula went into my collection unless it was the best of its kind. Gradually I began looking to other lands to satisfy my desire for new and unusual recipes. I found them in out of the way places, in cottages, in manor houses, in castles. I present them to the housewives around the world, with the hope that they may find as much pleasure in using them as I have found in collecting them and writing this book.”

j.p.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

PART I

Virginia Recipes 9
Gingerbread Cakes; Water Cakes; Shrewsbury Cakes; Tavern Biscuit; Drop Tea Biscuit; Maca-roons; Afternoon Tea Cakes; Jumbles; Virginia Cookies; Little Plum Cakes; Wafers; Ginger Cakes; Aunt Cinny’s Gingercakes; Chess Cakes; Citron Chess Cakes; Cocoanut Chess Cakes; Co-lonial Chess Cakes; Puff Paste; Beaten Biscuit; Hot Butter Tea Cakes; Ring Tea Cakes; Sugar Cookies; Sugar Biscuit; Hard Sugar Biscuit; Wild Honey Cakes; Honey Cakes; Black Cake; Grand-ma Hopkins’ Favorite Tea Cakes; “Derby” Cakes; Newport Egg Biscuit; Crullers.

New England Recipes 25
Hard Gingerbread; Coffee Ginger Cake; Ginger Snaps; Dark Gingersnaps; Ginger Cookies; Soft Ginger Cookies; Seed Cake; Caraway Cakes; Plum Cakes; Raisin Cakes; Small Fruit Cakes; Little Fruit Cakes; Fruit Cookies; Fruit Oatmeal Cookies; Oatmeal Cookies; Soft Oatmeal Cookies; Ground Oatmeal Cookies; Butter Cakes; Little Currant Cakes; Flat Cakes; Sour Cream Cookies; Spice Cakes; Chocolate Cookies; Fruit Snaps; Black Walnut Cakes; Hot Syrup Sponge Cake.

Scotch Recipes in Colonial America 39
Scotch Queen Cakes; Culpepper Oatmeal Cakes; “Oat Cakes”; Sorghum Cakes; Arrowroot Cakes; Scotch Short Bread.
 
Dutch Recipes in New York and Pennsylvania 43
Molasses Drop Cookies; Soft Sugar Cookies; Risen Doughnuts.

Recipes from New Orleans 45
Cocoanut Drop Cookies; Creole Cocoanut Maca-roons; French Fruit Cookies; Clabber Cake; Pecan Cakes; Cocoanut Pralines.

Modern American Recipes 49
Queens Gingerbread; Overnight Gingerbread; Butterscotch Cakes; Butterscotch Cookies; But¬ter Cookies; American Short Bread; Brown Sugar Short Bread; Card Gingerbread; Orange Wafers; Vanilla Wafers; Peanut Wafers; Walnut Wafers; Oatmeal Wafers; Almond Wafers; Cocoanut Wafers; Plain Jumbles; Fried Jumbles; Cinna¬mon Fruit Cookies; Quick Filled Cookies; Filled Cookies; Christmas Fruit Cookies; Fruit Drop Cookies; Raisin Cookies; Hard Fruit and Nut Cakes; Date Drops; Date Strips; Nut Cookies; Walnut Cookies; Chocolate Pecan Cookies; Plain Meringues; Nut Meringues; Date and Nut Me-ringues; Cinnamon Nut Meringues; Almond Macaroons; Peanut Macaroons; Pecan Macaroons; Cocoanut Meringues; Cocoanut Balls; Lady Fin-gers; Cocoanut Tone; Lemon Icing; Chocolate Tone; Date Tone; Orange Torte; Black Wal-nut Torte.

PART II

Cookies from Other Countries 79

French Recipes 80
Meringues a la Creme (Cream Meringues); Chaux au  Chocolat  (Chocolate  Cream  Puffs);   Vol-au-Vent, Chantilly (Tarts); Gateaux au Noix (Wal¬nut Cake); Gateaux Chambord (Sponge Cake); Baba au Med£re (Medeira Bread).

Recipes from Italy 84
Cavalucci di Italia (Nut Cakes of Italy); Colom-bos (Doves); Dolci Ravioli (Fried Tarts); Pan Dolci (Fruit Bread).

Recipes from Spain 87
Churos (Fritters); Bischochos (Biscuit); Ojaldas (Fried Cakes).

English Recipes 89
Banbury Cakes; Bath Buns; Rout Cakes; Al-mond Paste; Little Cakes to Ice; Rich Ginger Cake; English Tea Cakes; English Tea Biscuit.

Scotch Recipes 94
Bannock; Belfasts; Scotch Ginger Cake; Sour Cream Gingercake; Scones; Spoon Currant Biscuit.

Irish Recipes 97
Ginger Short Bread; Almond Short Bread; Pound Cake.

German Recipes 99
Mandel Schnitte (Almond Bars); Mandel Kranze (Almond Tea Cakes); Mutze-Mandel (Fried Al-mond Cakes); Nuss Platzchen (Nut Cakes); Man-del Platzchen (Almond Cakes); Mandel Stangen (Almond Strips); Mandel Kiichen (Almond Cakes); Kaffee Geback (Afternoon Coffee Bread); Haselnuss Makronen (Hazelnut Macaroons); But-ter-Ringe (Rich Butter Cakes); Zucker Platzchen (Sugar Cookies); Sandtortchen (Drop Cookies); Pfefferniisse (German Christmas Cookies); Weih-nachts Kiichelchen (Christmas Fruit Cookies); Mandel Bretzel (Almond Pretzels); Makronen (Cocoanut Macaroons); Zimmt Sterne (Cinnamon Stars); Weihnachts Kiichlein (Cookies for Christ-mas Tree Decorations); Anisplatzchen (Anise Seed Cakes); Leb Kiichen (Honey Cakes); Weise Pfefferniisse (White Peppernuts).

Austrian Recipes 110
Bundkuchen (Coffee Cake); Topfen Kolatschen (Cheese Cakes); Kipfel (Crescents); Sacher Tone (Chocolate Tone).

Recipes from Holland 113
Toffenstrudel (Cheese Cakes); Poffertges (Dough-nuts); Beverwyks (Spice Cakes); Platzen (Drop Sponge Cakes).

Danish Recipes 116
Frisk Brod (Fresh Bread); Butterdeg (Danish Puff Pastry); Kringler (Pretzel) Hoide Kager (Overnight Cookies); Jadekager (Jew’s Cakes); Sprut Kager (Cookie Press Cookies); Svendsker (Ring Cookies); Kleiner (Fried Cakes); Brune-kager (Brown Cakes); Sirupskager (Molasses Cakes.; Ableskiver (Apple Cakes).

Norwegian Recipes 123
Scun Cakka (Sand Cakes); Sand Bakels (Tea Cakes); Fattigman (Fried Cakes); Krumkaki (Rolled Wafers); Krom Krage (Cream Cakes); Berlinerkranzer (Egg Cakes); Bertines Mandel-bund (Almond Cakes).

Swedish Recipes 128
Kaffebrod (Tea Biscuit); Sprit Kakor (Butter Cakes);  Sprit Kransar (Swedish Cookies); Lisa-Kakor (Elizabeth Cookies); Kanelbrod (Toasted Cakes); Ess Kakor (S-Cookies); Mandelhorns (Al-mond Crescents); Spet Caka (The Cake of Scania).

Russian Recipes 136
Drachona (Russian Cakes); Tvorojiniki (Cream Cheese Cakes); Sirniki (Fried Cheese Cakes); Smettanick (Sour Cream Tarts).

Recipes from Turkey 139
Rahat el Halkum (Turkish Paste); Buerrik (Cheese Sticks); Baklava (Honey Squares).

Indian Recipes 142
Paratha (Whole Wheat Biscuit); Goolgoola (Fried Cakes).

Japanese Recipes 144
Yokan (A Sweet Made of Beans).

Chinese Recipes 146
Wt Beng (Moon Cakes); Hang Yan Beng (Almond Cakes); Tsoi Yan Beng (Sesame Cakes); Kai Tan Ko (Sponge Cake); Fa Shang Bo (Peanut Puff); Mat Nga Tong Beng Tsai (Malt Squares).

Mexican Recipes 150
Tortillas (Corn Cakes); Bunuelos (Fried Cakes); “Bien Me Sabe” (Cocoanut Squares).

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The Healthy Life Cookbook (1915)

The Healthy Life Cookbook (1915)

Title: “The Healthy Life Cookbook”
Author: Florence Daniel
Publisher: London, C. W. Daniel, ltd., 1915
Year of Publication: 1915
Pages: ~56
LOC Catalog Entry: http://lccn.loc.gov/17025070
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States

PREFACE:

“This little book has been compiled by special and repeated request.  Otherwise, I should have hesitated to add to the already existing number of vegetarian cookery books. It is not addressed to the professional cook, but to those who find themselves, as I did, confronted with the necessity of manufacturing economical vegetarian dishes without any previous experience of cooking. An experienced cook will doubtless find many of the detailed instructions superfluous.

The original idea was to compile a cookery book for those vegetarians who are non-users of milk and eggs. But as this would have curtailed the book’s usefulness, especially to vegetarian beginners, the project was abandoned. At the same time, non-users of milk and eggs will find that their interests have been especially considered in very many of the recipes.

All the recipes have been well tested. Many of them I evolved myself after repeated experiments. Others I obtained from friends. But all of them are used in my own little household. So that if any reader experiences difficulty in obtaining the expected results, if she will write to me, at 3, Tudor Street, London, E.C., and enclose a stamped envelope for reply, I shall be glad to give any assistance in my power.

I desire to record my gratitude here to the friends who have sent me recipes; to the graduate of the Victoria School of Cookery, who assisted me with much good advice; to Cassell’s large Dictionary of Cookery, from which I gathered many useful hints; to the Herald of Health, which first published recipes for the Agar-agar Jellies and Wallace Cheese; and to E.  and B. May’s Cookery Book, from whence emanates the idea of jam without sugar. Lastly, I would thank Mrs. Hume, of “Loughtonhurst,” Bournemouth, with whom I have spent several pleasant holidays, and who kindly placed her menus at my disposal.”

FLORENCE DANIEL.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

I. UNFERMENTED BREAD
II. SOUPS
III. SAVOURY DISHES (AND NUT COOKERY)
IV. CASSEROLE COOKERY
V. CURRIES
VI. VEGETABLES
VII. GRAVIES AND SAUCES
VIII. EGG COOKERY
IX. PASTRY, SWEET PUDDINGS, JELLIES, &c.
X. CAKES AND BISCUITS
XI. JAM, MARMALADE, ETC.
XII. SALADS, BEVERAGES, ETC.
XIII. EXTRA RECIPES
XIV. UNFIRED FOOD
XV. WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, AND UTENSILS
XVI. MENUS, ETC.
INDEX

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Successful Winemaking at Home (1961)

Successful Winemaking at Home (1961)

Title: “Successful Winemaking at Home”
Author: H. E. BRAVERY
Publisher: Gramercy Publishing Company • New York
Year of Publication: 1961
Pages: ~156
LOC Catalog Entry: http://lccn.loc.gov/62012119
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

PREFACE:

“NEVER before in the long, long history of home wine-making has the hobby enjoyed such tremendous popularity as it does today, with thousands of new enthusiasts joining our ranks every week. Fortunately we no longer have to follow antiquated methods and recipes that so often resulted in cloudy wines that would not clear, sour wines, acid wines or wines that turned into vinegar. Nor are we bothered with massive tubs and giant jars and masses of bottles of fermenting wines corked loosely (one of the main causes of spoiled wines) or any of the paraphernalia of the home wine-maker of a few short years ago. Modern methods are quick, clean, simple and sure. The result is perfect wines high in alcohol with that brilliance of clarity users of older methods will not believe until seeing for themselves.

The recipes contained in this book have been evolved by varying methods of mine which have appeared elsewhere in many magazines and which, following more than twenty years of experimenting in wine-making have proved to be the best, not only for making all the well-known home wines but for making genuine Vermouth, both French and Italian, and wines savoring of all the world-famous liqueurs including cherry brandy, Kirsch, Kümmel, Curacao, Morasquin and many others. The lemon gin wine recipe and orange gin wine recipe are the results of my most recent experiments and I take pride in offering them to my readers all over the world. As with all home wines, none of these specialties requires added spirit.

I must record my sincere thanks to the commercial firms who have so kindly supplied me with a variety of ingredients for my experiments, in particular to Semplex, of Old Hall Works, Stuart Road, Higher Tranmere, Birkenhead, and to H. J. Ruzicka (‘Fermenta’), of 95 Frampton Street, London, N.W.8, to R. H. and Meryl Stoner, and to the chief chemist and manager of a famous British winery (who wish to remain anonymous), for guidance during my early years of winemaking.”

H. E. BRAVERY

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Preface 1
Introduction—A chat about wine making 7
1 Essential information 13
2 Fresh fruit wines (with prize-winning recipes) 35
3 Root wines (with recipes that have made the author famous amongst wine makers) 51
4 Ribena wine 61
5 Wines from  prepared  extracts (genuine Vermouth, cherry brandy, etc.) 65
6 Wines for the ladies (preserved, sweet or dry wines of low alcohol content) 80
7 Recent experiments (gin-flavored wine with-out added spirit) 85
8 Wines from citrus fruits 88
9 Flower wines and miscellaneous recipes 91
10 Wines from dried herbs 98
11 Wines from dried fruits and grain 104
12 Wines from grapes 112
13 Liqueurs and party specials from home-made wines and extracts 116
14 Some questions and answers 134
15 Using the right glass. How best to drink wine 144
Appendix 147
Index 149

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250 Meatless Menus and Recipes (1910)

250 Meatless Menus and Recipes

Title: “250 Meatless Menus and Recipes”
Author: MOLLIE GRISWOLD CHRISTIAN
Publisher: Eugene Christian Moixh Gjuswolb Christian New York
Year of Publication: 1910
Pages: ~ 213
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter termFROM THE BOOK:The Object of This Book

My Work in the field of natural and curative feeding has convinced me that there is an universal demand for a practical family book on the subject of natural feeding.

The primary object of this work, therefore, is first, to educate the housewife and mother in the selection and preparation of food that will give the highest degree of efficiency, at all seasons of the year, in the form of energy and health; second, to secure these results with the greatest economy and the least amount of labor.

When the housewife or mother seeks information designed to change, improve and rationalize the family table, she is apt to read into a maze of tables, terms and technical phrases, with which she is wholly unfamiliar and, with the duties of the home pressing upon her, she has no time to study and learn.

This book is the most concrete form in which we can reply to the many thousand inquiries that have come to us from mothers and housewives from all over the land during the past few years in regard to naturalizing and making more healthful the family bill of fare.

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Book Of Salads (1959)

Book Of Salads

Title: “Book Of Salads”

Author: Mrs. Hyla Nelson O’Connor

Publisher: Arco Publishing Co. Inc. New York
Year of Publication: 1959
Pages: ~ 144
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

FROM THE BOOK:
IT HAS BEEN SAID that the reputation of many a good cook has been built on a simple green salad, prepared with dex­terity and loving care.

It all looks so easy and tastes so delight­ful, but let us give a thought to the background preparations.

The surest way in the world to have a salad failure is to use limp, lifeless unattractive greens. So select the best quality of salad greens available, and then clean and refrigerate them as soon as possible after purchasing.

After the greens have been properly stored and are crisping, then is the time to think of the serving. The most popular dress­ing for a green salad is a French type made with three parts of oil to one part of vinegar or lemon juice. From this point individ­ual tastes will rule regarding seasonings, kind of oil or kind of vinegar.

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Modern Candy Making (1904)

Modern Candy Making (1904)

Title: “Modern Candy Making”

HOW TO MAKE ALL KINDS  OF   CANDY

Author: JAMES S. WILSON
Publisher: GEO.  W.  OGILVIE & CO  CHICAGO, ILL
Year of Publication: 19o4
Pages: ~79
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

PREFACE

It is hardly necessary to make extended comment on, or introduction to, this little book. The following pages are filled with minute details of all things and everything pertaining to the subject of which it treats.

We can, however, say that it has been the aim of the author to gather the precise formulas of the best candies made from private recipes, also those sold by confectioners, and present them in such manner and a form so simple that any school girl or boy may concoct for themselves or friends the finest of candies at very little expense.

But there is a class of people who, from stern necessity, cannot afford to indulge in the best chocolate creams at a cost of from 60 cents to a dollar a pound, or other candies at proportionate cost, and are therefore compelled to deny themselves these luxuries; so to this class of people this little book will be invaluable, not only placing within their reach the choicest of confections, but practically eliminating the cost, because nearly all kitchens contain the various ingredients that go to make candy, and only the formulas are needed to combine them into the most dainty of luxuries.

THE AUTHOR.

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101 Best Party Recipes & Menus (1960)

101 Best Party Recipes & Menus (1960)

Title: “101 Best Party Recipes & Menus”
Author: EDITH M. BARBER
Publisher: STERLING PUBLISHING COMPANY INC., NEW YORK
Year of Publication: 1960
Pages: ~ 120
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

The Modern Trend in Hospitality    9
Buffet Suppers and Luncheons  13
Stag Parties   27
Outdoor Meals  32
Cooperative Parties  40
Church and Club Suppers and Luncheons  48
Small Dinner Parties and Luncheons  59
Cocktail Parties  71
Afternoon Tea and Sherry Parties  78
Evening Parties  83
Wedding Parties   89
Holiday Parties  97
Parties for the Young Fry 105
Parties for Teen-Agers Ill
Glossary of Cookery Terms 117
Index 119

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The Art Of Creole Cookery (1962)


The Art Of Creole Cookery (1962)

Title: “The Art Of Creole Cookery”
Author: by WILLIAM I.  KAUFMAN and SISTER MARY URSULA COOPER, O.P.
Publisher: Doubleday & Company, Inc. Garden City, N.Y.
Year of Publication: 1962
Pages: ~ 240
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

INTRODUCTION:

What is Creole cookery?

It is a recipe itself; for ingredients take Classical French cuisine…

Combine with equal parts of Spanish and Anglo-Saxon classical cuisine…

Blend well…

Take herbs and spices from France and Spain coupled with…

seasoning learned from the Choctaws and Chickasaws…

Take ingenuity of the refugee Acadians (Cajuns) who had to…

learn the use of nature’s own foods wherever they were to be found and from whom we have the jambalaya, court bouillon, red beans and rice, grits, grillades, pain-perdu, coush-coush caille, and gumbos…

Add the exotic taste and magic seasoning power of the African cook…

Voila! Creole cookery! whose tenets are economy and simplicity governed by patience and skill to produce a subtle, exotic, and succulent cuisine recognized throughout the world; a cuisine which stands apart from all others.

In the course of Louisiana history great chefs and restaurateurs arose who created dishes destined to become famous among gourmets of all nationalities. Their cardinal rule was to mate meat, fowl, fish, or game with the fruits of the fields and woods currently in harvest. To do this they evolved five requisites for Creole cookery.

1. THE IRON POT — handed down from ancestor to ancestor

2. THE BROWN ROUX — blend of butter, flour, and stock used as a base for gumbos, stews, vegetables, fish, and fowl

3. THE STOCK — in which they used materials others threw away … all game, fowl, fish, meat leftovers, bones, carcasses, shells, skins, giblets, etc.

4. HERBS AND SPICES — French, Spanish, Indian in origin interpreted by Negro cooks who gave Creole cookery its exotic, distinctive flavor

5. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES – exhaustive use of all known European grapes was made and that use was combined with knowledge of wild grapes learned from the Indians

Originally, Louisiana pioneers used only sugar rum in food but time and historic migratory changes added the use of whiskies, brandies, wine, etc., and from this evolved two schools of culinary thought. One, that alcoholic beverages should be added during the cooking; the other, that alcoholic beverages should be added to the food after the heat has been cut off. But in any event the Creoles devised wines and liqueurs from almost anything from which juice could be extracted. From fermenting cane juice comes Vin de Canne. Watermelons, pecans, geraniums, oranges, pineapple, rice, strawberries, kumquats, guava, figs, plums, and pomegranates were all utilized. A great favorite among desserts is a ball of crushed ice over which one or more of these fruit syrups, bran¬dies, or liqueurs have been poured.

It is to the Creole ingenuity that we attribute the creation of the cocktailan Anglo-Saxon version of the French word coquetier or egg cup in which an apothecary served a combination of brandy and bitters as early as 1793.

Despite the fact that Creole table service is formal and food customs still reflect the eating habits of the vieux carri (old French-Spanish quarter), Creole menus are surprising. There is an absence of conventional entries, and the novice gourmet will be introduced to such Creole delectable as fried pigs’ feet, calf s head, or curried liver.

Salads are most important in this cuisine, and Creole cooks are dedicated to the use of the chapona piece of bread rubbed with garlic and salt, placed in the bottom of the salad bowl while the salad is prepared and tossed, but removed before serving.

It is the custom in Creole families for each person to make his own salad dressing at the table, bearing in mind the advice of the ancient Spaniards that one must be miserly with the vinegar, lavish with oil, prudent in using salt, and spontaneous in stirring them all together to achieve a perfect blend. For the Louisiana gourmet the simple French dressing is considered best and most useful.

All Creole side dishes are prepared with great care and kept in a bainmarie (a roaster-like pan filled with hot water) to retain flavor.

Desserts are some exotic trifle which is a fragment of tradition, such as ambrosia, a combination of oranges, liberally sugared, chilled, and served with grated coconut.

In fine, no discussion of Creole cookery could be complete without mention of that small black cafs noir, coffee essential to every Creole meal. This specially brewed beverage, served in the tropical atmosphere of lush greenery, in a land perfumed with gardenias, is a gourmet experience never to be forgotten.

It is hoped that these “whiffs” of Creole cuisine will urge all the beholders of this book to try a hand at America’s most distinguished and distinctive contribution to world cookery. . .

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The Joy of Eating Natural Foods The Complete Organic Cookbook (1962)

The Joy of Eating Natural Foods: The Complete Organic Cookbook (1962)

Title: “The Joy of Eating Natural Foods: The Complete Organic Cookbook”
Author: Agnes Toms
Publisher: The Devin-Adair Company, Conn.
Year of Publication: 1962
Pages: ~400
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

AUTHOR’S PREFACE:

I hope this book will give you exciting new ideas about food. I’ve collected all my favorite recipes . . . dishes I’ve made in my own kitchen and many I’ve invented for hungry children at our school in Monrovia. I’ve tried to make them easy to find and fun to follow.

Everywhere in the United States, starting at the White House, people are talking about good nutrition. It is a subject that can sound awfully dull and complicated, but in this book I believe you will learn it easily and happily. There are a number of excellent books available for those of you who wish to go into all aspects of natural foods and nutrition.

I have not divided this book into vegetarian and non-vegetarian sections, but there are hundreds of recipes to delight the vegetarian under all chapter headings except those self-evident ones such as Milk, Eggs, Cheese, Meat, Poultry and Fish.

Now for a preview of some of the things you will find out as you get acquainted with this book:

Salads are a delightfully versatile combination of foods, and in that chapter you will discover ways to serve them as hors d’oeuvres, as an accompaniment to a meal, as a main course or as a dessert.

Foods for Special Occasions is a separate section because sooner or later most of us have to face up to the problem of what to do about a children’s party, how to manage that assignment to help with the PTA supper, what to serve when both male and female members of a committee are going to be hungry after meeting at your house, and . . . well, any other such predicament you may and probably will find yourself up against.

Left-overs are dealt with, certainly. But mostly they are left-over meats to be popped into soups, casseroles and salads. I have not included many left-over vegetables since they do tend to lose their food value and it’s so much better to try to cook the amount you need for each meal.

Flour in this book ought always to be unbleached white flour or whole-wheat flour, although ordinary flour may be used when only a small quantity is required for such uses as thickening a sauce. Your own flour mill is the very best way of assuring good flour and cereals. It may be a hand mill or a power mill, and you really should grind the amount you need each day, since the fresh whole product spoils quickly. These flours and cereals should be kept under refrigeration or in a cool, dry place where they will not absorb or be exposed to light.

Fresh-ground flours and cereals are available in most localities if you do not find it possible to own a home mill. These commercial mills usually produce an unbleached white flour, for breads, cakes and other dishes where you prefer a white flour. In general, the whole seed, finely ground, is most nutritious for your all-around use. But the so-called whole-wheat flour on the general market is even less desirable than the white flour from which the nutrients have been removed, because the whole-wheat product has had so many chemicals added to keep it from spoiling.

Milk and whole-grain flour complement each other beautifully, since the calcium in the milk is made more useable by the addition of the phosphorus found in whole-wheat. That is why I have used milk as often as possible in the whole-grain recipes. Raw, certified milk is, of course, the best.

Sweetenings in these recipes are as unprocessed and unrefined as you can obtain. Honey, sorghum, molasses and raw or brown sugar are just fine, and when any recipe calls for sugar, do remember that raw sugar is meant. Honey has a high nutritive value; a little goes a long way.

You will not find a chapter on jams and jellies, although a few nutritionally sound ones are included in the section on Sandwich Spreads. Most jams and jellies are made with white sugar and are neither nutritious nor needed in your daily meals. If you raise your own fruits and vegetables and find yourself with a surplus and no freezer to deal with them, then by all means can them. Your State Department of Agriculture or the U.S. Department of Agriculture will supply you, on request, with excellent instructions for canning fruits, vegetables and meats.

Freezing of foods can be done without sugar, as you will discover in the chapter on that subject.

Pressure-cookers are not dealt with under a separate heading, since excellent instructions come with these appliances. However, for you who live at high altitudes, you may find it useful to consult the adapted cooking times for such altitudes in the P.S. of this book. I always try to remember the warning that the “worst difficulty about pressure-cooking is that too often the cook forgets to take the food out when the time is up and the result is over-cooking and loss of important nutrients.”

I know it is a real problem for many people to find the food products mentioned in this book. To them, may I suggest some ways to deal with this problem:

1. Look in the Classified pages of your telephone book for health food stores in your area; or consult the advertisements in health magazines.

2. Search the shelves of your local market for unsulphured molasses, spray-dried milk, unflavored gelatin, honey, herbs, spices, nuts, vegetable oils.

3. Look for milling companies in your area and ask them about wheat germ, whole-grain flour, buckwheat, peanut, rice, and other flours. See if they have brown rice and whole soybeans.

4. Look for a hatchery near you for fertile eggs, or scour the neighborhood for some one who has a flock of chickens on the ground, with a rooster.

5. Get the health-minded women in your neighborhood together and demand that the local dairy produce raw certified milk; and be sure to ask your dairy where you can procure natural cheeses.

I have tried to meet the needs of everyone who may use this book; if there are omissions, or if you have suggestions about other things you might like to see in the next edition, please write to me in care of my publishers.

Good Health and Good Eating!

AGNES TOMS

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The Holiday Candy Book (1952)

The Holiday Candy Book (1952)

Quick stats:

Title: “The Holiday Candy Book”
Author: VIRGINIA PASLEY
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company, Boston
Year of Publication: 1952
Pages: ~131
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

FROM the first lollipop at the first children’s party to the gold-wrapped cherry cordial at a golden anniversary all of the festive occasions of a lifetime are associated with candy. There is no holiday that is not enhanced by candy and if it isn’t a holiday, candy will make it one.

There are the candies that set off every holiday throughout the year: candied popcorn stars and marzipan strawberries at Christmas time, pink and red hearts on Valentine’s Day, chocolate-covered eggs at Easter time, marshmallows to roast at the Fourth of July picnic and candied fruits and nuts on Thanksgiving Day.

Is there anything as delicious, as tempting or as satisfying as a piece of candy? There is the penny candy of our extreme youth — “I’ll take one of these and two of those and one of these” — choosing after solemn deliberation; the excitement over the candy apples on a stick when autumn comes; the wonderful if grimy mess of a childhood taffy pull; the first box of candy presented awkwardly by a speechless, gangling beau.

Candy tastes good and is good. And it tastes much better and is much better if you make it yourself. Whatever your favorite candy, whether butter crunch or fudge, nougat or molasses taffy, peanut brittle or chocolate mint patties, you can make it better than the best candy you ever bought. You can even learn to make fancy-dipped chocolates and bonbons that look as tempting as the ones you gazed at longingly as a child with your nose pressed against the confectioner’s plate-glass window. And they’ll live up to their looks, if you make them yourself.

If you feel the candy you’ve been eating isn’t as good as it used to be, don’t ascribe it to the tricks that memories of the good old days play on you. You’ve just not been eating the right candy. Homemade candy is better than ever. Try it and see.

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Easy Gourmet Cooking (1962)

Easy Gourmet Cooking (1962)

Quick stats:

Title: “Easy Gourmet Cooking”
Author: Elsie Lee
Publisher: Prestige Books, New York, USA
Year of Publication: 1962
Pages: ~160
Copyright Status: Public Domain in the United States and countries following the rule of the shorter term

Introduction from the book:

SPECIALTIES OF THE HOUSE… YOUR HOUSE!

Have you ever eaten at Maxims in Paris, or any of the really fabulous places whose specialties are as tempting to look at as they are to eat?

Elsie Lee’s EASY GOURMET COOKING is a rare and unique collection of these very special recipes that you can prepare in your own home. From subtle and exotic Oriental dishes to the superb cuisine of the Mediterranean, they are all here designed to make the simplest table elegant and please the most discriminating palates.

Your friends will be delighted and you will probably be amazed because these delicious recipes are easy to understand, and easy to cook, too. A shopping guide (where and how to buy some very special ingredients) has been included for your convenience, plus a variety of culinary secrets gleaned from years of experience by the best chefs of the world.

Sample From Chapter One…

QUICK TIPS TO QUICK COOKERY

These days, nothing is more fun nor more socially acceptable than “messing about in the kitchen.” What with pressure cookers, electric broilers and blenders, packaged mixes, bottled sauces, every possible herb or spice from the Indies, and something new every day in the frozen food section of any supermarket, Cookery is the latest game, the newest fad.

Now that women find it’s fun to cook, and men are remembering that every great name in gastronomy from Epicurus to Escoffier is masculine, the next step is Gourmet Cookery and turning yourself into a Cordon Bleu is no longer difficult.

In this book we present a selection of great traditional dishes, as well as some “novelties.” All are designed to be prepared in a limited time for the modern day reproduction of a Lucullan Feast and all are proportioned for four hungry gourmets. Note, too, that all gourmet recipes are intended for adults because a child’s palate does not develop until the late teens.

Even ten years ago, many of these recipes could not have been included, and there is no denying that some great culinary masterpieces still cannot be prepared in only thirty minutes. Even with a pressure cooker, the true Coq au Vin, Blanquette de Veau or Boeuf BourguigNonne, while edible cannot possess the suave blend of flavors that comes from leisurely simmering.

Time is essential too, for chilling or resting of some dishes that can easily be prepared in a few minutes. Therefore, a few recipes are included that require 30 minutes or less to prepare but which must be allowed to stand overnight before the final minutes or preparation and service.

These are marked Two-Step Cookery; neither step requires more than 30 minutes but if you like to think this a quibble, we can only recommend that you try the dish and hope it will be found worthy of inclusion.

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What To Drink – The Blue Book of Beverages (1920)

What To Drink – The Blue Book of Beverages (1920)

Ok ok, this is book of non-alcoholic drinks but what the heck!

Quick stats:

Title: “What To Drink – The Blue Book of Beverages”
Author: BERTHA E. L. STOCKBRIDGE
Publisher: D. APPLETON AND COMPANY, USA
Year of Publication: 1920
Pages: 187
Copyright Status: Public Domain (pre-1923)

Keyword Results:
Daily searches for “drink recipes” as provided by freekeywords.wordtracker.com

 

From the book:

There are a number of things worth considering when serving drinks at home. First among these is the use of attractive glassware. Good looking glasses cost no more than ugly ones, and clear fine glass polishes better than heavy blurred glass. And surely any drink is more pleasing to the palate if the eye is pleased. Be sure that the glasses shine, and also ascertain that glasses meant to hold cold drinks are chilled.

Almost all fruitades, no matter what the name or foundation, contain lemon juice, so it is also well to remember that lemons intended for squeezing should be peeled, and that very carefully. While the lemon peel, or the zest, rather, is an excellent flavor, it is not satisfactory in lemonade, as there is a little bitterness when it stands, which displeases some people.

Most of the recipes given for these fruitades are for individual drinks, to make it easier for the hostess to ascertain how much to prepare if she knows the number of people to be served.

A cocktail shaker, an ice shaver and a long-handled spoon are almost a necessity in making drinks. They are at least a great aid, and as none of these things is expensive and all may be obtained in the housekeeping department of any city shop, or in the hardware store in small towns, there seems no reason for not owning them.

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